Deborah Drucker in Laguna Beach Magazine

LBMlogo-350DEBORAH DRUCKER

Company: Deborah Drucker Inc.
Based in: Laguna Beach
Resides in: Laguna Beach

To find out what happens when Gucci’s sensuality meets rock ‘n’ roll attitude, just take a look at Laguna Beach-based designer Deborah Drucker’s druckerdebut collection. The daughter of a former Gucci timepiece designer and the wife of Stray Cats bassist Lee Rocker, Deborah considers her foray into fashion the result of a natural progression. “I worked for my father, then I was a wife, [then] I raised my kids and now was the right time for me to pursue my passion for design,” she explains.

Tongue-in-cheek and rocker-chic, Deborah’s designs juxtapose classic silhouettes—pencil skirts, tailored jackets, tie-front blouses and cropped trousers—with contemporary creations like The Betty, a knee-length dress with a fitted bodice and a full skirt that Deborah envisions Lucille Ball wearing. Each piece features Deborah’s signature details, which include self-made animal prints and custom hardware (think skull-shaped zipper pulls).

Her commitment to exceptional detailing extends to all aspects of production. “I appreciate deconstructed [pieces] and am a huge fan of Rick Owens, but for me and what I do, it is about finessing the finish,” Deborah explains.

According to Deborah, the foundation for each piece begins with the fabric, which she chooses based on rudimentary sketches and color palettes. She’s particularly drawn to delicate fabrics such as silk charmeuse, tropical weight gabardine, silk chiffon and Italian lambskin leather, which can be seen in her current line.

The line—her first—can be found exclusively at A’Maree’s in Newport Beach and Shari’s Place in Greenvale, N.Y. “The vision [for the collection], in my mind, was sort of traditionalist with an unexpected twist,” she says. “Perhaps equivalent to the guy who loosens his tie at the end of a long day, has a shot of bourbon and the fun side comes out.”

In the future, she aspires to be carried in the “top 10 finest boutiques in America” and maintain a commitment to the highest quality of stateside production. “I do not want to [expand to the point of manufacturing] overseas,” she comments of the company’s future. “I would like to stay a ‘made in America’ brand, so if we need to grow slower, then that is how we will go.” (deborahdrucker.com)LBM

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